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So what do you think of them now?


abrungot

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With all the focus on NASCAR & Late Model racings... is not having a Super Late Model Series like ROMCO or USRA Hurting Asphalt racing in Texas at this time?

 

Or by some of the stars like Bradley, Casey, & Colt on the east cost Sheading Light to Texas Racing?

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I love the "supers" but the cost to run one is so high that only a handfull of racers can afford them.The "Pro" class has been growing every year and is starting to really "catch on" out East.Mike put his pro motor back in Stephans car because the rules even favor them.

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As a fan,I understand the demise of the class due to the overunning costs to the car owners and track owners.But you will never ever convince me that there is a replacement class for them...ever.Now that I have been reminded of what I am missing,in this desert wasteland for stock car racing,I'll just go cry.

 

BTW...I made sure my vacation fall just right so I wouldn't miss the TSRS and Grand National cars on the 19th. B)

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The ROMCO series Super Late Model races were always packed. The cars were awesome and the energy in the air was great. If I was ever introducing anyone new into the circle track scene, I always took them on romco nights. TSRS cars are great, really great and they are all we got left, its the only series that the laymen spectator can relate to "nascar" cars. I hope it sticks around.

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Me personally - I will save my money and travel to take in one of the SLM shows at Five Flags or South Alabama or Mobile - there is NOTHING more exciting to watch - and thank goodness we have some Texas drivers mixing it up and winning against such awesome field of drivers - The SLM class speaks for it self when you have Kyle Busch, David Stremme, David Ragan, Butch Miller, Bobby Gill, Gary St. Amadt, Mike Garvey, Wayne Anderson etc etc .... still running the short tracks with their SLM .. I wish Texas could get another BIG Shot going just to give us fans a shot in the arm once a year to get us excited about racing.

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I love the "supers" but the cost to run one is so high that only a handfull of racers can afford them.The "Pro" class has been growing every year and is starting to really "catch on" out East.Mike put his pro motor back in Stephans car because the rules even favor them.

 

I have to disagree somewhat. The cost of racing in TSRS is not much different than the SLM class. These cars are more alike than most people might think. Some of these guys are still spending 20k on a bullet. 5k on a set of penskes.

 

I hope to be able to run the slm locally again but Im not counting on it. JMO

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I love the "supers" but the cost to run one is so high that only a handfull of racers can afford them.The "Pro" class has been growing every year and is starting to really "catch on" out East.Mike put his pro motor back in Stephans car because the rules even favor them.

 

I have to disagree somewhat. The cost of racing in TSRS is not much different than the SLM class. These cars are more alike than most people might think. Some of these guys are still spending 20k on a bullet. 5k on a set of penskes.

 

I hope to be able to run the slm locally again but Im not counting on it. JMO

A super motor cost 40 to 50 thousand dollars!!!Thats along way from 20k!!!!!!!And don't forget the high dollar tires that last one race oh and if you are going to be competitive you will need a set for practice also!!!!

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Landlord maybe right on the engines but the tires were not 'high dollar'. Now, all of well funded teams would have a couple of sets a night but they were the same McCreary/American Racer or Hoosier(depending on what year) that is still around today. Unfortunately, TSRS runs on 8's which last one night and are about $10(give or take)cheaper.

 

I think TSRS is a good show in Houston but sometimes it looks like there is no respect amongst competitors and many cars get tore up at Kyle. As well, this year will be a test with the cost of transportation and other costs in general. I know my budget is only going to allow a limited schedule.

 

turbotoddie

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Landlord maybe right on the engines but the tires were not 'high dollar'. Now, all of well funded teams would have a couple of sets a night but they were the same McCreary/American Racer or Hoosier(depending on what year) that is still around today. Unfortunately, TSRS runs on 8's which last one night and are about $10(give or take)cheaper.

 

I think TSRS is a good show in Houston but sometimes it looks like there is no respect amongst competitors and many cars get tore up at Kyle. As well, this year will be a test with the cost of transportation and other costs in general. I know my budget is only going to allow a limited schedule.

 

turbotoddie

I do not have any experience with the TSRS teams,but there was some of them on here wanting to stay with those tires because they said that they held up better than the proposed Goodyears.I forgot to mention the maintenance that goes along with the dry sump motors and the fact that they don't last as long as the TSRS or Pro motors.

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Dont rule out the USLMA series. They have multiple drivers from Texas running in their races. Right now they run at Altus Speedway, and at Sandia in New Mexico, but a race at Red River is probably in the future. This is a good series, the promotor is a great guy who really trys to take care of his racers. www.uslma.com

;)

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some people are way out of touch with things. I believe the $16,000 super late model sealed engines are kicking tail and there is no way the stock clip late models can run with the super lates. You can spend as much as you want one, but that does not always matter.

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some people are way out of touch with things. I believe the $16,000 super late model sealed engines are kicking tail and there is no way the stock clip late models can run with the super lates. You can spend as much as you want one, but that does not always matter.

No doubt Dewayne McGunegill has changed things with his "low cost" super motors.Casey Smith and some others have done very well with them.The rules for a sealed super motor are different than for an unsealed motor.I am not sure thats fair but thats the way it is.Hopefully this trend will continue and bring these soaring motor prices back down a bit.$40,000 for a motor is way to far out there for the average short track racer!!!!!I think the main problem with trying to get a stock clip to hang would be the roll center disadvantage that they have.

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You know guys the TSRS cars are super close to the super latemodels, they look like them, sound like them but can't stop like them or handle like them because of the 8" tires. Most of the cars in the series have the equipment to run the 10" tires and as for dry sumps being needed, the races are not long enough to dictate the need and hell the crate motor pro late models are running close to the same times as the old supers with wet sump motors and a much lighter car that pulls more g's. and they live. Surely the 500 2bbl motors would live at the heavier weight. I wish TSRS would see that they could really have even more cars and even better racing if they would figure a way to combine the TSRS cars and the Pro Latemodel style cars, instant car count of all latemodels available in Texas. The other idea is a Pro Latemodel with a TSRS motor, these cars would fly and you would not have the teching headaches of the crate motors. I think the TSRS is very well run and Mary Ann is probably the best promoter in the state, and here officials are very competent. But for some reason people just will not respect it as a real late model series because of the 8" tires, both racers and fans alike.

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I BELIEVE CC SPEEDWAY IS LOOKING AT STARTING A LATE MODEL CLASS RIGHT NOW.tHIS MIGHT BE A GOOD TIME TO PROVIDE SOME USEFUL IMPUT AND ESTABLISH RULES THAT WILL INCLUDE MOST LATE MODELS.COULD A TRACK PROVIDE A WEEKLY SERIES AGAIN? WOULD THE CARS COME?IN MY OPINION TOO MANY NICK PICKING RULES SPOILS WHAT COULD BE A GOOD THING.JMO.

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TOO MANY NICK PICKING RULES SPOILS WHAT COULD BE A GOOD THING

LOL

 

Maybe he means "pic nicking" or maybe "nit picking" or maybe "nic nicking," but certainly not "nick picking." I didn't pick no rules Miss Scarlett!

 

Nick

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I think the main problem with trying to get a stock clip to hang would be the roll center disadvantage that they have.

 

Not sure about that. I have worked on several stock clipped LMs and Pro Modifieds that have achieved ideal front roll center locations and competitive bump steer numbers.

 

The biggest problems I have with the stock front clips when compared to a fabricated frame are: 1) the geometry lends itself to caster changes that are sometimes disconcerting as the car body rolls 2) they are heavier than a fabricated clip. 3) Some of the suspension components are heavier than those typically used on a fabricated frame.

 

However, if running a big bar/soft spring configuration so popular in classes that run bodies that are designed to keep air from under the car, the undesirable geometry change is only felt as the car nose dives on turn entry and as the nose lifts under acceleration. So all that remains is the weight issue which could be easily cured by adding 25 pounds to the at, or in front of, the front axle centerline.

 

Just my opinion...

 

Nick

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I think the main problem with trying to get a stock clip to hang would be the roll center disadvantage that they have.

 

.

 

However, if running a big bar/soft spring configuration so popular in classes that run bodies that are designed to keep air from under the car, the undesirable geometry change is only felt as the car nose dives on turn entry and as the nose lifts under acceleration. So all that remains is the weight issue which could be easily cured by adding 25 pounds to the at, or in front of, the front axle centerline.

 

Just my opinion...

 

Nick

I agree here 100%. I know theres another series that added 25lbs but forget which one. Texas needs some common rules so cars can float. I dont think tsrs will because they have good car counts and hmp already went crate. So how do we get on the same page. |I would like to see a car be able to run tsrs hmp louisanna and uslma but I am a dreamer!

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Landlord says,

I do not have any experience with the TSRS teams,but there was some of them on here wanting to stay with those tires because they said that they held up better than the proposed Goodyears.I forgot to mention the maintenance that goes along with the dry sump motors and the fact that they don't last as long as the TSRS or Pro motors.

 

Can't tell you anything about tires as I feel more clueless the more I learn. However, I totally agree with you on the engine maintenance costs. As well, I agree with Fishracer about 10's. Late Models just don't even look right on 8s but that is the rule so be it. I just want to race and will never go crate!! Too much room for BS.

 

turbotoddie

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I think the main problem with trying to get a stock clip to hang would be the roll center disadvantage that they have.

 

Not sure about that. I have worked on several stock clipped LMs and Pro Modifieds that have achieved ideal front roll center locations and competitive bump steer numbers.

 

The biggest problems I have with the stock front clips when compared to a fabricated frame are: 1) the geometry lends itself to caster changes that are sometimes disconcerting as the car body rolls 2) they are heavier than a fabricated clip. 3) Some of the suspension components are heavier than those typically used on a fabricated frame.

 

However, if running a big bar/soft spring configuration so popular in classes that run bodies that are designed to keep air from under the car, the undesirable geometry change is only felt as the car nose dives on turn entry and as the nose lifts under acceleration. So all that remains is the weight issue which could be easily cured by adding 25 pounds to the at, or in front of, the front axle centerline.

 

Just my opinion...

 

Nick

Never worked on a stock clip car.With only stock adjustments to work with I would think it would be hard to get the stock sub frame to stop short of dragging and keep a handle on all the steering issues that goes into a set-up like that.These new cars are designed to get low with their 1/4 flat bar front cross member and raised rack mts.It would be hard for a stock clip car to get that low.

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