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Frame integrity


RBSF

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When I was cutting the modified apart that we built Flipr out of, I came across some disturbing stuff, may apply to some of y'alls cars. The lower/bottom tube rails had collected water, froze, and split the tubing in numerous spots. It wasn't until I peeled the old metal off the "floorboards" that most of it showed up, but I suspect those splits will impact the frame's integrity and should be included in an inspection of your frame when you're off for the winter. There's quite a bit of frame you can't see with the bucket and skin on. Of course, if you live where it never freezes this may not have happened!

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OK, interesting point seeing as winter (such as it is in Texas) is upon us.. All OEM frames that I have seen have drain holes included for areas where they are boxed and may accumulate water. Our race cars, using tubing, are the exception but it bears consideration for how the cage is built. Ideally, every weld is continuous, ends are capped and the cage is otherwise sealed. Then we go and poke holes all over it to insert pop rivets! Obviously, when you consider it, it is the exception, rather than the rule, that the cage will accumulate some moisture over time inside the tubing. It would make sense then to include drain holes at several points along the bottom of the tubing to let the moisture out. Of course it also makes sense to store our race cars in a nice dry garage someplace out of the weather :)

 

BTW, don't forget to drain your cooling system!

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Keep it out of the rain.

I'm sure that's good advice, but just might be a bit late if a car has already been exposed to water and freezing temperatures.

1/8" relief holes at low points has been suggested.

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Besides, why would that much water get in a cage or tube frame rail? Chassis should be boxed in.

 

Temperature variances, especially in south Texas, cause condensation.....and yes even the inside of roll bar tubing, boxed frames, etc. sweat some.....

 

Now if a car sits an enviromentally controlled garage/shop....probably far less of an issue.....

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Every time I see a car with panels riveted to the chassis or roll cage tubing it amazes me. It doesn't take very long, or much material to weld tabs to the tubing so you'll have a better place to rivet to.

Yeah, it comes to a couple pounds of material by the time you put mounting tabs around the car, but it's better than turning your roll cage in to swiss cheese!

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