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SPEED SECRETS for 4 cyl FWD race cars


tricknology

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SPEED SECRETS for 4 cyl FWD cars,,,

 

Here is some of speed secret stuff for FWD 4 cylinder cars,,,these guys run in Lansing Michigan and are FAST with Stock 4 cyl. FWD cars

 

This is the old Pony Stock "Speed Secrets and Tricks" message thread.

 

http://spartanspeedway.com/OldBoardStuff/P...eedSecrets.html

 

WARNING: This is a big web page, about 180 posts, over 600K. On a dialup connection, it might take 3 minutes or more before the page finishes loading entirely. So give it time. For you lucky hi-speed users, it's not a huge problem.

 

Lots of set up tips and gearing info, read all 180 posts and read all the links, IT WILL MAKE YOU FASTER!

 

also here is the spartan speedway message board links

 

 

http://spartanspeedway.com/forum/index.php

 

4m.net is a very large nation wide racing forum,,, THEy have a very good ministock tech forum,,,so register , then go to the Mini stock Tech forum and learn.

 

Also read the old messages on this 4 cylinder tech link, they have a lot of guys who know both FWD and RWD 4 cyl cars,, so ask your question here or on the Spartan Speedway forums,, the michigan guys are alway willing to help.

 

 

 

 

http://www.4m.net/index.php

 

Sleepy Trip, tech writer from Stock car magazine has his own web site, he is building a NEON to race in Florida, and has posted all the tech articals

 

here are the Tech articals,,,

 

http://www.ovaltrackdigest.com/article-directory.htm

 

 

Links for making a NEON faster, lots of this info will apply to any FWD 4 cyl car....

 

(NOTE! build the 4 door neon, not the 2 door, the 4 door is lighter and stronger!!)

 

the Neons. org forums

 

http://forums.neons.org/index.php

 

for Dodge Neon discussions on performance improvements...

 

try...

 

http://forums.neons.org/viewforum.php?f=8

 

also try....

 

http://forums.neons.org/viewforum.php?f=22...0&start=100

 

and.....

 

http://www.neons.org

 

 

HONDA PERFORMANCE TIPS

 

http://crx.honda-perf.org/forums/viewtopic.php?t=6937

 

http://crx.honda-perf.org/forums/viewforum.php?f=4

 

http://www.hondaforums.com/

 

http://www.honda-tech.com/

 

http://superhonda.com/forum/index.php?

 

 

For Tech info on the 2.2 2 valve OHV engine GM Chevy Cavalier and Pont. Sunfire overhead valve 4 cyl. engine....

 

www.tomorrowstechnician.com/tt/tt30216.htm

 

I would use a 1997 car and engine, install pistons from a 1998 2.2, to raise the compression ratio, OR have a 1998 2.2 and install the 1997 head and intake,,, either one will raise your compression ratio! Have Russ a Crankshaft Craftsman in Detroit regrind the stock roller cam to Oval track specs. . and instal a racing chip in the computor, and run 2% Nitro in the fuel.

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For dodge racers go to,,,

 

http://www.mopartsracing.com/parts/neon.html

 

For stiffer suspension springs and stiffer swaybars and Torque Sensing Differentials,,,

 

Also All NEON racers should install the thicker ACR front hub listed In the catalog and sold by Dodge which is used in SCCA racing. The Stock Neon hub may be too weak and may fail under racing conditions!

 

This catalog also lists the Dodge Factory Racing PCM's for the Neon that have a better Fuel and Spark curve for more HP,,,and have a higher rev limit. The stick shift PCM's will work with a Automatic trans....

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Eibach makes stiffer stock looking suspension springs For MOST FWD 4 cyl cars and they also lower your car,,,

 

http://eibach.com

 

 

 

 

 

Performance Chips and PCMs for most cars,,,if you do not find what you want call the companys and they will make what you need ,,,,

click on links below,,,

 

 

http://www.jetchip.com/

 

http://www.jetchip.com/products.asp

 

http://www.venom-performance.com/nf/html/v400.cfm

 

http://www.performancecenter.com/product/C...%26+Programmers

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The previous link FOr NEON Mopar perfomance parts no longer list the still available 1995 to 1999 NEON MOPAR performance parts here is an old catalog with all the part numbers, springs, PCM's, etc,,

 

http://neons.org/forumdodge/

 

http://www.bpemopar.com/NEON.htm

 

C. Coil Springs ( they are only about $55 s pair ! CHEAP )

 

These Mopar Performance Coil Springs will add a new dimension to your car’s handling and performance. Reduce body roll and attack corners with confidence on the street and track. Upgrade base model vehicles to ACR/RT level, and upgrade ACR/RT models to higher levels. Select spring sets lower car as noted. Sold in pairs.

P5007003 High Rate Autocross Coil Springs-Front, 225 lbs./In., 1" Lower Ride Height (1995–99 Neon)

P5007004 Extra-High Rate Autocross Coil Springs-Front, 310 lbs./In., 1" Lower Ride Height (1995–99 Neon)

P5007005 High Rate Autocross Coil Springs-Rear, 185 lbs./In., 1" Lower Ride Height (1995–99 Neon)

P5007006 Extra-High Rate Autocross Coil Springs-Rear, 230 lbs./In; 1" Lower Ride Height (1995–99 Neon)

 

A. NEW! Rear Tension Strut Kit

Rear Tension Struts feature a high-durometer bushing material designed for heavy duty and competition use. The revised design results in improved toe stability (reduced bump-steer), which virtually eliminates rear wheel hop under heavy braking. Provides more positive suspension control for improved driver feedback and dynamic stability.

P4510826 Rear Tension Strut Kit-Left and Right (2003–05 SRT4, 2000–05 Neon)

 

B. Performance Struts

These rebound adjustable performance Struts will improve the handling and performance of your Neon. Precision manufactured struts are the same as those found on the 1995–99 Neon ACR. Meets SCCA Club rules. Includes all mounting hardware. Sold individually.

P4876812 Front Strut (1995–99 Neon)

P5007000 Rear Strut (1995–99 Neon)

 

 

 

 

WHEEL COMPONENTS

 

D. Hub and Bearing Kit

 

This kit upgrades standard hubs and bearings to service Neon ACRs. Upgrade is recommended for non-ACR Neons used for racing purposes. ACR hubs and bearings should be replaced after 12 on track hours. Kit includes 1 hub and 1 bearing. Same as production 1995–99 ACR.

P5007314 Hub and Bearing Kit (1995–99 Neon ACR)

 

IGNITION AND ELECTRONICS

 

C. Engine Controllers

These emissions exempt (D-265-18) Engine Controllers are a direct replacement and will increase horsepower and torque without affecting drivability. 7,800 rpm rev limit. Requires the use of premium fuel. Manual transmission vehicles only.

P5007033 PCM (1995 Neon SOHC)

P5007034 PCM (1995 Neon DOHC)

P5007035 PCM (1996 Neon SOHC)

P5007036 PCM (1996 Neon DOHC)

P5007037 PCM (1997–99 Neon SOHC)

P5007038 PCM (1997–99 Neon DOHC)

Note: Emissions exempt in California, Massachusetts and

New York only.

 

CAMSHAFTS AND CAMSHAFT TOOLS

 

A. Camshaft

Engineered exclusively for Neon, this camshaft was developed for power while maintaining reliability and idle quality. Camshaft package includes cam, front seal and cam lube. Use with valve spring P5249846.

P5007030 Camshaft — 6 hp Increase, 2 hp with 2001 H.O. Engine (1995 Neon SOHC)

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#19 Neon,,,,

 

Glad we here in Michigan helped out a little, How well do the Neons run against Hondas at your track?

 

from the Spartan speedway web site,,,

 

Easy Steps to build a Pony or F.W.D. Pure Stock

Information Contributed by : Torg Motorsports

 

 

---------------------------------------------------------------------

-----------

 

 

Find a suitable car. It's best to purchase your first racecar already put together. But if you decide to build one, here are some tips. Watch the races and see what the fast guys are driving, chances are they have already researched different makes and models and are racing a style of car for a reason. Experience suggests GM and Chrysler are the best cars to race with because the front suspension of both of them is adjustable for camber and the entire front suspension is mounted on a cradle. Being on a cradle allows you to replace it if you bend it.

 

You should look to spend a small amount of money on a car because you will be removing everything out of it. Look for a car that has been taken care of and not rusted out. A rusted car will take a lot of repair before being able to weld in a roll cage. Be sure to look under the car and check for rust. Most cars have some rust, you just don't want one that has rust HOLES.

 

Interior/Roll Cage

Ok so now you picked out a car. Remove the entire interior, you don't want to leave anything that could catch fire when you start welding. If you want to leave the dash and shifter that's OK. Also remove all glass, the windshield is optional.

 

As for the roll cage. Now is the time to find some help. If you're not an experienced welder you should find one. After all your very life may depend on how well the roll cage is welded together. There are many local people that would be willing to install a cage for you. Check with the race track as many of the racers are willing to do this. When finding a company to install the cage ask if they will be bending the tube or buying a kit form. Bending the tube will result in a better fit, but buying a kit is sometimes cheaper.

 

Racing Seat

Once the car has a cage you can purchase a racing seat and safety equipment. The rules will only allow aluminum seats. Normally there are lots of used seats available you just have to look around. Be sure to buy a seat that fits snug and holds you well. Snug is better. When mounting the seat be sure to use at least 3/8 bolts, grade 8. A little work here will pay off really well. You should use four to six bolts to hold the seat down.

 

Belts

The rules call for a five point, three inch wide belt. RCI and G force make some really good belt systems that are reasonably priced. Don't buy used belts, as all belts are dated and must be replaced every 3 years.

 

Engine

Do a tune up on the engine and check the compression. The compression should be 125+ psi and no cylinder should be less than 100psi. Change all the fluids; drain the antifreeze replace with water. Replace the engine accessory drive belts. It is also a good idea to change the oil and filter in the transmission.

 

Fuel Cell

You should run a fuel cell, I know some tracks say you don't need one but it's not really that costly and will help you out in the long run. Running a stock tank is not a good idea because you will have to keep a lot more fuel in the car. Stock gas tanks are not designed to keep the fuel in place during a night of racing. There is no foam in the stock tank and the fuel will slosh around making it hard to keep the right fuel pressure to the engine. If you run a cell you can keep less fuel in the car and the foam will keep it in check to allow the fuel pump to keep a good supply of fuel to the engine. Less fuel equals less weight in the car. When running a fuel cell you will need to run an aftermarket fuel pump. Most of the racers are using the frame mounted fuel pump from an 88-91 Ford truck. Just ask the parts store for a frame mounted external fuel pump for an 89 F-150. The pump runs on 12volts and will pump plenty of fuel.

 

Suspension

Tires are the most important part of any car! Check with the other race teams and find out what tire they are running. Be sure to check and see what's legal. Good tires will make the difference in the way your car handles. Buy a good air pressure gauge, tire pressure is the biggest adjustment you will be making. You should also buy a tire pyrometer. It's a temp gauge that you will use to see how well the tires are working. Tires will be the most used/checked thing on your racecar. You will need to keep a lot of information on your tires. Every time you get to the track check your air pressure before every race and every practice. The air pressure in your tires will change with heat. About 1psi for every 7deg F. You will need to make adjustments that allow for this to happen and not upset the car. So for Example your tires are running at 140°F and it's 80°F outside. (Ex: 140°- 80° = 60° / 7 = 8.5psi)

 

You will need to reduce the air in your tires by 8.5psi to allow the right pressure when racing. Again tires are the most important part of the car. You need to learn as much about them as you can. Keep really good notes and you will have something to fall back on when the track changes.

 

Toe and Camber setting

Toe is the angle that the tires have toward each other. Look down at your feet. If your toes point toward each other then you are toed in. If your toes point away from each other then you are toed out. The same goes for your racecar. If your tires are pointed toward each other then they are toed in and visa versa. You will need to set the toe, and camber on your car every week. Always check it after any contact with other cars. You should set the front toe to 0" to 1/16" OUT. On some cars the rear toe is adjustable, be sure to set it too. In the rear you should run 0" to 1/16" IN. Be sure to check your toe often and learn to adjust it.

 

Camber

Camber is the angle at which the top of the tire is tilted in or out. If you are turning left all the time you should tip the RF tire in at the top. With camber in it allows the tire to stay in contact with the road surface longer and turn the car better. More camber is not always better. This is where you need to check the tires after you run and move the camber and toe until the tires are the same temperature all the way across.

 

In a front wheel drive car most of them are running 2deg out on the left front 7deg in on the right front 1.5 In on the right rear 0 on the left rear.

 

Ok, so now you have a car with a roll cage, seat, belts, fuel cell and the suspension has been set. Buy a good fire suit and a "S" Rated Helmet and Go Racing.

 

 

 

 

Note: To learn more about racing in the Pony or FWD Pure Stock divisions, you can join our Mentorship Program by contacting the Spartan Speedway office at (517) 244-1042.

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#19 Neon,,,,

 

Glad we here in Michigan helped out a little, How well do the Neons run against Hondas at your track?

 

 

Well, actually, I run (ran) a Honda CRX for the past 2 1/2 years. :lol::lol:

 

I am switching to a Toyota for 2007 (or possibly 2008 as the car is still not done yet.) I run with a touring series called the Texas ProSedans and we run only asphalt. But we also have 2 local classes here in South Texas called the Texas Thunders, one runs on dirt, and the other one on asphalt. TPS has not had a Neon in it YET. One of the Hot shoes from the Thunders (who kicked but on both dirt and asphalt) will be joining us this year. I personally expect him to do quite well. AND now that you just gave him all of that information, he will have no excuse not too!! LOL...

 

They call him NeonWill - (cue the music!!)

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From spartan speeway web site....POSTED BY....

 

Maurice Randall (Mopar93)

Senior Member

Username: Mopar93

 

Post Number: 696

Registered: 05-2003

 

 

Posted on Wednesday, June 14, 2006 - 09:54 am:

 

-------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------

> Camber ? How much RF, LF, RR, LR. ?

 

It depends on the car and the tires being used. But generally, you want to get as much negative camber in the RF as you can. Note: Negative is when the top of the tire is tilted inward. 6-8 degrees of negative camber generally works well in the RF. About 2-4 degrees of positive camber works in the LF. Maybe 2-4 degrees of negative camber for the RR. Don't worry about the LR since it has little effect on handling. 0 degrees works OK for the LR.

 

How do you increase the camber settings?

 

I am only familiar with how to change the camber on the Mopar cars. Someone else can chime in about the other cars.

 

Near the bottom of the front struts are two large bolts. These are used for adjusting the camber on the front. You can also use smaller bolts, but don't go any smaller than 1/2 inch. This will get you a little more adjustment. You might also have to grind a little off the steering knuckle to allow it to tilt more towards the strut. For more than about 7 degrees on the Mopars, you'll have to lengthen the lower control arm. This modification was OK'd a few years ago and hasn't been disallowed as of yet. It creates a few headaches though. The right axle is now a little short.

 

In the rear, the camber is adjusted with shims. There are four bolts that hold the spindle to the axle. Shims between the spindle and axle at any of the bolt locations will tilt or turn the spindle in relation to the axle. This is how you adjust the camber and toe in the rear on the Mopar cars. Some of the other cars are done similarly while others may have adjusting cam bolts.

 

> What are typical Toe setting settings for the front and rear?

 

This can vary due to car and driver preferences. But generally, I've found anywhere from 1/8 inch to 1/4 inch toe-out works on these cars.

 

> If the more toe out is added, is it done on the left or right side?

 

Start by centering the steering rack and then adjust the toe equally on both sides to get the toe-out you want. Then when you want to change it slightly, just adjust one side or the other a little. It doesn't make a great deal of difference which side you adjust as long as it's only a minor change.

 

> Should you have Rear Sway bars? if so should they be thick or thin?

 

The Neons and other cars with fully independant rear suspension might be slightly different in their handling setup. A top Neon team can help with their setup here.

 

I'll mention what can be done with the Shadow/Sundance/Daytona type cars. This also applies to other makes of cars with similar rear suspensions. You want to soften the roll in the front and stiffen the roll in the rear. What this means is you either want a softer swaybar or no swaybar at all in the front. In the back, you want a swaybar or a stiffer one than you already have. Most of these cars do not come with a rear swaybar. Ever since this class was started, many of the faster teams have been looking for ways to stiffen the axle itself. The axle in these cars acts like a swaybar. If it can be made to have more resistance to twisting, the car will handle better. This is what happens when you see the left rear tire coming off the ground in the corners.

 

> Front Sway bars, do you use them? thick or thin ones?

 

Answered above. I prefer not to use a front swaybar.

 

> How much faster did installing the right gear ratio make your car?

 

It depends on what ratio you are comparing to. In the case of the Mopar cars, there is really only one ratio to run at Spartan. Any other setup will put the engine over 6100 rpms and will cause the built-in rev limiter to kick in. The .91 ratio transfer gears are needed along with the 2.86 ring and pinion gears. The transmission is run in first gear.

 

For Springport, you can install the commonly available 1.06 transfer gears and run fast. With the rare 1.22 gears, you can run a little faster, but not much. The 1.06 gears are just about as quick if you're running by yourself, but if you get in traffic and have to lift off the throttle, it takes longer to get back up to speed. You have to keep your momentuum up and try to run in the outside groove to keep your speed up.

 

> When weighing the car where you can read the weight of each wheel,,,

> which wheel should weigh the most?

 

The left front should be the heaviest.

 

> which wheel should weigh the least?

 

The right rear should be the lightest.

 

> what is a typical crossweight % ?

 

Exactly opposite of what a rear wheel drive car should be. When the computerized scale is displaying cross weight, it should show something like 45-48 percent. This is actually 52-55 percent using the LF and RR wheels for the calculation.

 

> Do want more weight % on the front or the rear?

 

You want to shoot for about 2/3 of the car's total weight to be on the front axle. Make the rear of the car as light as you can.

 

> Waht is a typical front weight % ?

 

A good car will generally show 62-67 percent front weight.

 

> When adding lead to a FWD racer, where should the weight go?

 

Towards the left front but behind the LF wheel and down as low as possible. If you can't fit it in there, then it should still stay on the left side as much as possible. Don't put the weight in front of the front wheel and don't add any behind the rear wheels.

 

> The stiffest spring(s) should be where?

> The softest spring(s) should be Where?

 

The front springs will always be the stiffest. The rear springs don't need to be stiff at all since they are carrying very little weight.

 

> What should the HOT tire pressures be?

 

This can vary a little depending on the car and the tires being used, plus the driver preferences. But generally, I've found the following to work good when coming in after a hot practice session:

 

RF 50-54

LF 43-46

RR 42-45

LF 50+ (make it hard so it rolls easily)

 

-Maurice

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> Do want more weight % on the front or the rear?

 

You want to shoot for about 2/3 of the car's total weight to be on the front axle. Make the rear of the car as light as you can.

 

> Waht is a typical front weight % ?

 

A good car will generally show 62-67 percent front weight.

 

> The stiffest spring(s) should be where?

> The softest spring(s) should be Where?

 

The front springs will always be the stiffest. The rear springs don't need to be stiff at all since they are carrying very little weight.

 

Hmm... Maurice might want to read up on roll couple distribution theory.

 

Nick

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Wow! This is alot of information all at one time. This is the most MEGA posting that I have ever seen. I would call these "marathon posts" LOL! Thanks for all those mopar part #s and neon links, now you gave out all my secrets, but thats ok the more neons the better. Neon Will

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Dear Mr. Nick Holt,

 

Please share more info on your FWD chassis setups,,,

 

for some back ground Info, with the setup Mr. Maurice Randall posted they won track championships and many features at a tracks that had about of these 30 cars every night, and the competition was close.

 

these cars Are NOT allowed Locked or posi-traction final drives, Max tire size 195- 70 or 75 series, and must have Stock engines and suspensions.,,,tyhey run on 1/4 and 3/8 asphalt tracks...

 

 

Mr. Holt, what is your baseline setup with a FWD car?

are you allowed locked or positraction final drives?

what tire sizes do you run? street or racing tires?

Stagger?

dirt or asphalt?

 

Thanks, Your Info will help many new racers.

 

Arnold.

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Most of us 4 cyl FWD cars run on asphalt. Most run a locked diff. (maybe not CC thunder)

We race on racing slicks w some stagger.

Mr Holt has been helping 4 cyl cars go faster since I first met him in the mid 70s

While I would be the first to say there is more than one way to skin a cat, I can attest

to the fact that my car gets around the track faster thanks to Nick Holt.

 

Mike Knotts

Texas Pro Sedan #48

VW scirocco

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Dear Mr. Nick Holt,

 

Please share more info on your FWD chassis setups,,,

 

for some back ground Info, with the setup Mr. Maurice Randall posted they won track championships and many features at a tracks that had about of these 30 cars every night, and the competition was close.

 

these cars Are NOT allowed Locked or posi-traction final drives, Max tire size 195- 70 or 75 series, and must have Stock engines and suspensions.,,,tyhey run on 1/4 and 3/8 asphalt tracks...

 

Mr. Holt, what is your baseline setup with a FWD car?

are you allowed locked or positraction final drives?

what tire sizes do you run? street or racing tires?

Stagger?

dirt or asphalt?

 

Thanks, Your Info will help many new racers.

 

Arnold.

 

Mr. Arnold. It would not be fair to those teams I have worked with in the past to divulge specific set up information, so I will explain using generic concepts.

 

Frankly, the advice that was given regarding front-to-rear weight distribution and spring selection for a FWD car is questionable at best. While it is possible to balance just about any weight/spring combination, it is far better to set up around known physics principles.

 

A FWD oval track race car, like most other oval track or road racing cars, should be as near 50%-50% front-to-rear weight distribution as possible. While it is highly unlikely that any FWD teams would be able to obtain this ideal distribution (unless the rules required a very heavy minimum weight), that's the direction they should be headed. The closer one gets to a 50-50 setup, the fewer handling crutches are needed to balance the car.

 

And, contrary to what many would consider "common sense," the lighter the rear of the car is, the stiffer the rear springs need to be, especially the right rear spring. Or, the stiffer the rear sway bar needs to be.

 

Likewise, the heavier the front of the car is, the softer the front springs should be, especially the right front spring. Or, the softer the front sway bar needs to be. Obviously, there are limits as to how soft the front springs can be so you will often see front-running FWD cars with large rear sway bars and stiff right rear springs to compensate for the understeer that is generated by having so much weight at the front.

 

I do not have the space or time to fully explain roll couple distribution theory here, but I do explain it in detail in my suspension seminars, complete with class notes.

 

Mr. Holt has been helping 4 cyl cars go faster since I first met him in the mid 70s

While I would be the first to say there is more than one way to skin a cat, I can attest

to the fact that my car gets around the track faster thanks to Nick Holt.

 

Mr. Knotts,

 

I just assumed you weren't listening while I was ranting and raving about suspension theory. I figured you were mentally planning your next cruise to the Bahamas, Europe, etc., instead.

 

Nick

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Dear Mr. Nick Holt,,

 

I am NO expert on FWD racing chassis setrups,,,,mainly just a messanger.

 

But Perhaps we are compairing apples to pears here, and that might explain the different chassis setups.

 

Most 4 cyl FWD classes;

 

do not allow locked final dirves ,,like your class does.

 

do not allow racing tires,,, like your class does.

 

do not allow excessive lightening of the chassis/body,,like your class does.

 

do not allow extensive engine mods ,,, like your class does.

 

I know that in RWD bomber classes that do not allow locked rear ends we wind up running a lot wedge and put a lot of weight on the LR to get it to hook up the rear wheels,,,when we switch to locked rear end we decrease the wedge and remove weight from the LR. Maybe the same thing is happening here with the FWD cars?

 

Also withthe min weights most classes have and not being allowed to gut the car to reduce wieght,, many cars are already over weight, and already have big front weight %,,,to get 50/50% weight ballance they would have to add 100's of pounds of lead the the rear and then be 100's of pounds too heavy.

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Messed that up.On added weight,CC Speedway made me add 280#s to my Scirroco so I added it under the seat and on the left side .rear.To my surprise the car handeled better.Open diff and street tires on a 1/4 mile hi banked asphalt track.Push was reduced and not spinning the LF anymore.Downside is it takes longer to stop.Lap times are better.Trick guy the 4M website has gone through a total makeover,how did you find the old stuff.Wish you had all that info for VWs,Im not a big Neon fan. :lol:

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YOU!!!!! :angry: Life was fun till you showed up.Cant intimidate you,cant trick you,cant outrun you,cant even make you nervious anymore.Glad your going Pro.I still see Neons rather than sheep jumping the fence when I cant sleep. :lol:

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Well Mr. Holt, as a matter of fact I just returned from 2 weeks in Egypt. 1 week scuba diving the Red Sea.

1 week learning the secrets of camel racing (2WD & 4WD) Also, the cab drivers in Cairo would make great race car drivers. They are crazy!

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Honda Civic stick shift tranny gear ratios,,, from the honda civic forum,,,,

 

http://www.hondacivicforum.com/m_45588/tm.htm

 

 

Thanks To FinalImpact For This Article!!

 

Transmission Name Engine Counter Part 1st Gear 2nd Gear 3rd Gear 4th Gear 5th Gear Reverse Final Drive

L3 88-91 HF 3.250 1.650 1.033 0.823 0.694 2.954 (3.250 Cali) 3.880

L3 88-91 DX 3.250 1.894 1.259 0.937 0.771 3.153 3.880

L3 88-91 Si 3.250 1.894 1.259 0.937 0.771 3.153 4.25

L3 JDM Integra ZXi 3.250 1.894 1.346 1.033 0.771 3.153 4.437

L3 JDM DOHC ZC 3.250 1.944 1.250 0.909 0.878 3.153 3.880

L3 USDM D16A1 Integra 3.181 1.944 1.347 1.033 0.823 3.153 4.216

 

 

Honda throttle body sizes,,,

 

http://www.hondacivicforum.com/m_45186/tm.htm

 

Thanks To FinalImpact For This Info!!

 

Designation, Size (in mm):

 

b18c1-60

b18c5-62

b18a-58

b18b-60

b16a SiR-58

b16a Sir2 / b16a2 / b16a3-60

b20b/z-60

f20c-62

d15b7-56

d16a6-55

d16y7-56

d16y8-56

d16z6-56

ZC-55

d16a1-55

d16a8-55

h22a / h23a-60

f22 / f23-60

 

Honda D engine specs,,

 

http://www.hondacivicforum.com/m_45184/tm.htm

 

Thanks To FinalImpact For This Info!!

 

D13A2 1.3 8V SOHC 2bbl Carb 1342 60hp@5500rpm 73tq@3500rpm 87 Civic/CRX 1.3

D15A2 1.5 8V SOHC 2bbl Carb 1488 76hp@6000rpm 84tq@3500rpm 87 Civic/CRX 1.5

D15A2 1.5 8V SOHC 2bbl Carb 1488 58hp@4500rpm 80tq@2500rpm 87 Civic/CRX HF

D15A3 1.5 8V SOHC PGM-FI 1488 91hp@5500rpm 93tq@4500rpm 87 Civic/CRX Si

D15B1 1.5 8V SOHC PGM-FI 1493 70hp@5500rpm 83tq@3000rpm 88-?? Civic

D15B2 1.5 16VSOHC PGM-FI 1493 92hp@6000rpm 89tq@4500rpm 88-91 Civic DX/LX

D15B6 1.5 8V SOHC PGM-FI 1493 62hp@4500rpm 83tq@3000rpm 88-89 Civic/CRX HF

D15B6 1.5 8V SOHC PGM-FI 1493 70hp@4500rpm 83tq@3000rpm 90-91 Civic/CRX HF

D15B7 1.5 16VSOHC PGM-FI 1493 102hp@5900rpm 98tq@5000rpm 92-95 Civic DX/LX

D15B8 1.5 8V SOHC PGM-FI 1493 70hp@4500rpm 83tq@3000rpm 92-95 Civic CX

D15Z1 1.5 16VSOHC VTEC-E PGM-FI 1493 92hp@5500rpm 97tq@4500rpm 92-95 Civic VX

D16A6 1.6 16VSOHC PGM-FI 1590 108hp@6000rpm 100tq@5000rpm 88-91 Civic/CRX Si

 

D16A8/9 1.6 16VDOHC PGM-FI 1595 137hp@6800rpm 108tq@5700rpm 88-91 Civic/CRX/Integra LS

 

D16Y5 1.6 16VSOHC VTEC-E PGM-FI 1590 115hp@6200rpm 104tq@5400rpm 96-00 Civic HX

D16Y7 1.6 16VSOHC PGM-FI 1590 106hp@6200rpm 103tq@4600rpm 96-00 Civic CX/DX/LX

 

D16Y8 1.6 16VSOHC VTECII PGM-FI 1590 127hp@6600rpm 107tq@5500rpm 96-00 Civic EX (USA)

 

D16Z6 1.6 16VSOHC VTEC PGM-FI 1590 125hp@6600rpm 106tq@5200rpm 92-95 Civic EX/Si/Del Sol

 

D17A1 1.7 16VSOHC PGM-FI 1668 115hp@6100rpm 110tq@4500rpm 01-02 Civic DX/LX

D17A2 1.7 16VSOHC VTECII PGM-FI 1668 127hp@6300rpm 114tq@4800rpm 01-02 Civic EX

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Dear Honda Experts and including Mr. Holt,

 

Here in the Midwest many tracks and the IMCA have created Pure stock classes based on the 4 cyl FWD sedans that are plentiful and cheap. The HOt cars typically seem to be Honda civic, Mitsubisi Eclips, Hyudai Tiburon, Neon.

 

Typically these class rules are;

 

do not allow locked final dirves

 

do not allow racing tires

 

do not allow excessive lightening of the chassis/body

 

do not allow engine mods, only stock Fuel inj allowed, even the exhaust manifold must be stock

 

the car , suspension, and engine must ""LOOK STOCK TO THE EYE""

 

Given these constraints, and if you were asked to build the IDeal Honda,,,

 

Which Model, engine type, trans type and Year HONDA would you build and WHY?

 

Also please expand your choice to intalling a different model Honda engine into a Civic,,, such as installing a bigger engine from a Accord or Integra,,,

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Based on these 2007 IMCA rules, which HONDA car (model, Year, body style), Honda Engine and trans should a new racer pick to build and race??

 

Which tires would you suggest running ? ( TIRES AND WHEELS: OEM DOT 13, 14, 15 or 16-inch passenger tires only. No racing, mud or snow tires. No re-caps, softening, conditioning, siping or grooving allowed. ) ??

 

 

IMCA Sport Compact

 

 

Cannot be licensed in any other division and must be at least 14 years old.

 

Copyright © 2007 IMCA All rights reserved.

No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored, or transmitted in any form, without prior written permission.

 

1. SAFETY EQUIPMENT: Rules apply at all times car is on the race track. Snell-rated SA95, SA2000 or SA2005 helmet required. Roll bar padding required in driver compartment (Fire retardant recommended). SFI-approved full fire suit required. Fire retardant neck brace, gloves and shoes required. Driver-side window net required, minimum 16”x20” ribbon or mesh style, and must be mounted so latch is at top front of window. Minimum three-inch wide five point safety belt assembly required (Y-type shoulder harness not allowed) must be mounted securely to roll cage, recommended to be no more than one year old. Kill switch required within easy reach of driver and must be clearly marked “OFF” and”“ ON’.

2. BODY/CHASSIS: Any front wheel drive, compact car with three or four cylinder engine. All cars must remain strictly OEM. Must be unaltered OEM-appearing body. No convertibles or two seat sports cars allowed. Maximum wheelbase 105 inches. OEM steel unaltered floor pan only. Inner fenders may not be removed. Hood and trunk lid/hatch must be securely fastened. All doors must be securely welded or bolted. All glass, exterior lights, chrome/plastic trim and hood insulation must be removed. Dash may be removed, but can remain. Bumpers must be welded, chained or cabled to frame and have front and rear tow hook. OEM bumper covers must remain.

3. ROLL CAGE: Six-point roll cage required. Must use minimum 1.50-inch O.D. and .095-inch wall thickness tubing. Rear hoop must have “X” bracing configuration. Rear kickers required. Must have 1.25-inch minimum O.D. cross bar in top halo. Cage must be electric welded. No iron, galvanized pipe or fittings, square tubing, brazing or soldering allowed.

4. DOOR BARS: Minimum three horizontal door bars on driver side and two horizontal door bars on passenger side. Both sides must have vertical bracing from top to bottom door bars. All tubing must be minimum 1.50-inch O.D. and .095 inch wall thickness.

5. DRIVER COMPARTMENT: Minimum three windshield bars and protective screen mounted in front of driver. Aluminum high-back racing seat required. Must be securely mounted using 0.375-inch bolts. Driver must be sealed off from track, engine, transmission and fuel cell/tank. No mirrors. No gutting allowed except for roll/door bar clearance. All flammable material, radio and air bags must be removed. Front and rear firewalls must remain and have no holes. Interior must remain open.

6. SUSPENSION AND STEERING: All components and mounts must be unaltered, OEM and match year, make and model of car used. No weight jacks, modifications, racing components, aftermarket or homemade tractions devices allowed. Rear wheels must track straight ahead and be in alignment with front wheels. No more than 5 degrees camber on any wheel. No center steering. Quick release steering wheel is allowed, must maintain OEM column. No remote reservoir power steering.

7. SPRINGS/SHOCKS/STRUTS: All shocks and struts must remain OEM, in OEM location. One spring rubber allowed in each spring.

8. TIRES AND WHEELS: OEM DOT 13, 14, 15 or 16-inch passenger tires only. No racing, mud or snow tires. No re-caps, softening, conditioning, siping or grooving allowed. Must be OEM steel or aluminum wheels, with standard bead bump and maximum seven inch width. All four tires and wheels must be the same series, size and offset. Tires must be inside of body. No wheel spacers or bleeder valves. Reinforcing of wheels recommended. Must use one inch O.D. steel lug nuts.

9. BRAKES: Must be steel, unaltered, OEM operative, four wheel disc or drum brakes, and match year, make and model of car used. OEM master cylinder only, in OEM location. No brake shut off or bias adjuster. Steel brake lines only.

10. EXHAUST: Exhaust manifold must be unaltered, OEM for year, make and model of car used. Smog pump, catalytic converter and air conditioning compressor may be removed. Track may require mufflers (IMCA recommended).

11. WEIGHT: No ballast (extra weight) of any kind allowed. Any item deemed as ballast will be required to be fixed.

12. BATTERY/STARTER: One 12-volt battery only. Must be securely mounted with positive terminal covered. OEM starter only, must be in OEM location. Car must start without being pushed or pulled from initial staging area or go to rear of that race.

13. GAUGES/ELECTRONICS: 12 volt ignition system only. No ignition boxes. No performance chips. All ignition components must be unaltered, OEM and match year, make and model of car used.

14. FUEL SYSTEM: Must have complete, unaltered, OEM fuel system for year, make and model of car used. Gasoline only, maximum 93 octane. No performance additives. Gas tanks ahead of rear axle allowed but must install shield under it. Gas tanks behind rear axle must be replaced with maximum eight gallon fuel cell and relocated to trunk area. Must be securely mounted using two, .125-inch thick, solid steel straps, two inches wide, completely around cell. Metal firewall must be between driver and cell. Fuel cell vent, including cap vent, must have check valve. No cool cans. Fuel lines through driver compartment must be steel.

15. TRANSMISSION: Must use OEM, unaltered transmission that came in year, make and model of car used. All forward and reverse gears must be operational. Flywheel, flexplate, clutch assembly and torque converter must be unaltered, OEM for year, make and model of car used. No mini clutches or couplers. Must have inspection hole in bell housing. No transmission coolers in driver compartment. No torque dividing final drive.

16. ENGINE COMPARTMENT: Engine and radiator must be OEM, in OEM location for year, make and model of car used. May use solid engine mounts or safety chains. No accumulators/accusumps. No reinforcing except installation of front strut crossbar.

17. ENGINE: 3 or 4 cylinder in-line engines only. All engine components must be OEM unaltered for year, make and model of car used. Must use OEM crank, rods, valve sizes, stroke, etc. No aftermarket racing heads. No high performance or sports car engines of any kind. No turbo charged, super charged, rotary engines, or engines utilizing variable cam-timing.

18. VEHICLE IDENTIFICATION NUMBER (V.I.N.): The V.I.N. must remain in the OEM location. It must be clearly visible and unaltered in any way. Any car missing the V.I.N. will not be allowed to compete.

19. CAR CLAIM: Follow engine claim requirements and procedures in official IMCA rule book.

(A) $1500 cash claim or exchange on complete car.

(B) Claim does not include – 1. racing seat, 2. safety belts, 3. fuel cell (if equipped).

 

AMENDMENTS TO THESE RULES MAY BE MADE AT ANY TIME IF CERTAIN TYPES OF CARS ARE DOMINATING.

 

For more information, call IMCA at 319-472-2201.

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For more information, call IMCA at 319-472-2201.

Copyright © 2007 IMCA All rights reserved.

No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored, or transmitted in any form, without prior written permission.

 

I suppose they gladly gave written permission.. LOL

 

Nick

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For more information, call IMCA at 319-472-2201.

Copyright © 2007 IMCA All rights reserved.

No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored, or transmitted in any form, without prior written permission.

 

I suppose they glady gave written permission.. LOL

 

Nick

i thought the same thing ...... .. ....its gladly nick ..... ;)

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  • 2 weeks later...

It looks like for 2007, the IMCA sport compact rules are WIDE OPEN to ANY FWD 4 cyl car!!

 

to all members of the Texas Speedzone, you guys are very smart,

 

so,,,In your opinion,,,

 

What would be the HOT cars to build???

 

DOHC Cobalt?

 

Dohc Focus?

 

Eclips?

 

Neon?

 

Tiburon?

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