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neon14

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my first race car was a 68 chevy .that car had 7 different color paint jobs on it .and someone did it a roller and brush. took my poor wife two weeks of chipping at that stuff just toget it close enough to look haff a$$ desent . never do that again .pore gas and burn it off . :lol: that 89 cent walmartspray paint did the trick .and it was still ugly .

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  • 3 months later...

This is kind of a long story, but perhaps you will get something useful from it. When we bought our race car it was pretty fast, but looked really rough. It had been a circle track race car for many seasons and it showed. The car had the spray can paint job in black with amatuer lettering for the numbers. At that time I worked in a parts store and we sold paint to body shops. I was planning to buy paint at the store's cost, a normal perk of working in a parts store. One of our customers was in one day and was asking about the race car and I told him of my plans to paint it in the off season. He said come buy your paint from me. He owned a heavy equipment dealership. I told him he was crazy, that I wasn't going to paint my race car catapiller yellow or equipment gray. He insisted that they had a good selection of colors. So I told him, I was still going through our store because of the discount. He said he could sell me the paint cheaper than I could get it at our store even with our discount. At the time we were selling most paint for around $12 a gallon. He told me he could sell to me for $6 a gallon. So off I went to his store. There it was a pretty blue, very close to Petty blue and a white that looked as good as any to me. I bought a gallon of each.

Prep time. Not being body men or painters, we really didn't know what to do and weren't interested in a bunch of sanding. We knew it needed to be clean, so we pulled out the pressure washer. This was at my partners truck terminal, heavy pressure washer. It clean and even blew off chunks of the old paint. When nothing else came off we let it dry. A friend brought a paint sprayer and the bottom got blue and the top got white. I left out something, we did knock out the bigger dents. No serious body work or bondo, just the big dents. My boss at my part time job hired a sign painter to paint our signs and numbers and the car looked awesome. At the car show in the mall people that knew of the car were complementing us on putting a new body on the car. And from the stands, we had the best looking street stocker out there. $12 and not a clue and a pro sign painter that we didn't have to pay. Life was good!

 

I've always wondered why a wagner wouldn't work on a race car?

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yep.....everybody is a painter.

 

Speaking for myself, I was not in anyway trying to say our paint job was as good as a professional could do, just that for our purposes it was good enough. Since our race car only cost $850, it would be understandable if we didn't spend $100-200 (going rate for a cheap pro job back then) or more on a paint job, that might not last until the next race and of which the finer points could not be noticed from the stands.

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I tried a Wagner one time. It doesn't work well at all for auto paint. I always used paint cans but you have to always touch up as it tends to flake off after awhile. The better the spray paint the better it looks and the longer it lasts.

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I know this is a bit off the topic, but I'd thought I'd throw this out anyway.

 

Nobody would bolt a 10 pound piece of lead to the roof of a stock car - at least those that race on asphalt.

 

To put weight up that high in the car would put that car at a disadvantage in the turns. High weight raises the center of gravity height - not a good thing. Not only does it raise the CG height, but due to the length of the moment arm connecting the bolted-on lead to the chassis' roll axis, stiffer springs are needed to handle the increased body roll that is generated.

 

I have seen - and you probably have too - cars with coat after coat of primer, paint and sealant of their roof. And all that paint is usually topped off with a pound or two of heavy vinal numbers and the driver's name plastered on both sides of the roof for all the world to see. Very nice to look at, but all that weight up top reduces the car's handling potential. And it really doesn't matter to the car if the extra weight is painted on or bolted on. High weight is high weight.

 

On the other hand, I know of teams that go to great lengths to reduce the amount of high weight in their race cars. Acid dipped roofs, names appearing on the car's rocker panels instead of the roof, lightweight paint, no primer and the smallest car numbers allowed under the rules are just a few of the measures taken by some teams that I know to reduce the top weight.

 

Nick

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Bill Hite didn't even paint his cars because of the weight of the paint. Some of his customer's went ahead and painted them, but he didn't. I don't know if the car Chet Fillip drove at Phoenix was the same car that Ricky Ott drove, but neither of them sported a paint job.

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My uncle painted his car with a Wagner and auto paint,still looks good except for where the tree was hit in the front. A racer at cowtown started using houde paint on his figure8 car because if you ran up front the pretty paint did not last anyway,just had to look decent from the stands.

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